AT&T And Verizon Reject Request To Delay 5G Roll Out

Big Telecom has a New Years’ resolution: 2022 is the year when, finally, finally, after much fanfare, delay, and rethinking, it executes its roll-out of 5G mobile service. And they’re willing to do it by any means necessary— even if…

Jennifer
Verizon and 5G.
Photo Credit: Verizon.com
Sign up for insightful business news.

Big Telecom has a New Years’ resolution: 2022 is the year when, finally, finally, after much fanfare, delay, and rethinking, it executes its roll-out of 5G mobile service.

And they’re willing to do it by any means necessary— even if it means defying the US federal government, the pleading aviation industry, and risking a few planes falling out of the sky.

Infrequent Proposal

On Friday, the FAA and US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg sent a letter to AT&T and Verizon requesting a two-week delay for the planned January 5 launch of C-band spectrum 5G wireless services, which operate on a frequency that may overlap or interfere with those used by vital aviation tools. Specifically, the request called for a delay near “priority airports,” mostly located near major US cities. All of this comes after Verizon and AT&T already agreed in November to pause the network’s deployment until the New Year.

By Sunday, Stankey and Vestburg penned a letter in return. Their response? A resounding “no.” Amid the spat, both industries contend with high stakes:

  • In a letter to the FCC, powerful trade group Airlines for America claimed 5G interference may result in 4% of all US flights being diverted, delayed, or canceled. In 2019 terms, the group calculated 32 million passengers, 345,000 passenger flights, and 5,400 cargo flights would be affected— a cost of potentially billions of dollars.
  • AT&T and Verizon– which paid over $80 billion in a government auction for the rights to use the frequencies– claimed granting the FAA oversight over 5G rollout would constitute an “irresponsible abdication” of operating control over world-class technologies.

The French Concession: The telecom CEOs, however, did offer one point of compromise. If aviation interests deescalate, the telecoms would agree to certain “exclusion zones” near major airports for six months, a model that’s proven successful near French airports where US airlines safely land despite nearby 5G service operating on the pertinent frequency.

Analysis more

Tale of the Tape: Warren Buffett and Cathie Wood

Farm Strong: Understanding Agriculture as an Investment

Recent News

Fandom Nabs TV Guide and Metacritic in Media Merger

Google Drops Translate App in China

Liz Truss Pulls Screeching U-turn on Plans to Cut Taxes for Britain’s Wealthiest

A Strong Dollar Could Save a Horrid M&A Environment

[subscribe-form listid="1ebbb697aaa44fb1971fe0a3c42ff841" source="organic" medium="organic" redirect-url="https://thedailyupside.com/thank-you/"]
<form action="" class="subscribe-form "> <input type="text" name="subscribe_form_email" placeholder="Enter your email"> <input type="text" name="subscribe_form_name" placeholder="Enter your name" value="" class="c-subscribe-from_field"> <button class="c-btn" id="subscribe-form-submit" type="submit">Subscribe</button> <div class="subscribe-form-message"></div> <div class="subscribe-form-vars"> <input type="hidden" class="subscribe-form-param" name="params[listid]" value="1ebbb697aaa44fb1971fe0a3c42ff841"> <input type="hidden" class="subscribe-form-param" name="params[source]" value="organic"> <input type="hidden" class="subscribe-form-param" name="params[medium]" value="organic"> <input type="hidden" class="subscribe-form-param" name="params[redirect_url]" value="https://thedailyupside.com/thank-you/"> </div> </form>